Preventing Digital Damage: 4 Tips For Managing Your Child’s Screen Time ~ Guest Post

Preventing Digital Damage: 4 Tips For Managing Your Child’s Screen Time ~ Guest Post

Today’s guest post Preventing Digital Damage, has 4 tips for managing screen time. I have a screen time schedule for the boys. If you manage screen time for your kids, how do you do it? Let me know in the comments below.

Preventing Digital Damage: 4 Tips For Managing Your Child’s Screen Time ~ Guest Post

Preventing Digital Damage: 4 Tips For Managing Your Child’s Screen Time

by: Christine Martin

The digital age has given new generations of parents something extra to worry about:

How much screen time is too much?

Physicians, teachers and psychologists generally agree that spending inordinate amounts of time immersed in computers, smartphones or social media can negatively impact a child’s developing mind and body. A screen time study published recently in JAMA Pediatrics found a link between excessive screen time and later development milestones.

Other studies have associated digital overuse with teen depression, and the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued guidelines suggesting daily limits on screen time for different age groups.

“It’s the responsibility of the parents to get control of this and guide their children, from a young age, on the positives and negatives of screen time,” says Christine Kyriakakos Martin (www.youvegotthisparenting.com), an early education expert and author of You’ve Got This! Keys To Effective Parenting For The Early Years.

“Parents can often think it’s acceptable for a young child to spend a couple hours with an iPad, but the type of education the iPad game is providing isn’t always the type of learning most needed at that stage.”

Martin has suggestions for how parents can manage screen time and decrease a child’s risk for screen-related health or developmental problems:

Distinguish screen time from play time. Play is a fundamental learning tool for young children, but parents, Martin says, should not think of screens as toys for play time. “When screen time is limited and separated from other types of play, parents show their children the importance of setting boundaries, using their imaginations, and being active.”

Get involved. Parents who engage with their children about on-screen activities can help them increase their communication skills and teach them how to navigate digital media. “Parents can talk with their children about the videos they watch and games they play like they would discuss characters and plotlines in a book,” Martin says. “When there is parental engagement like this, a child’s vocabulary and literacy skills develop and family communication gets stronger.”

Make mealtimes screen-free. “Eliminate screens from the meal table, including when you’re out at a restaurant,” Martin says. “While it can be tempting to pack the iPads to have some adult conversation while you’re out to eat, doing this doesn’t teach your children about manners, properly engaging in conversation, or being mindful of other patrons.”

Set a good example. It will be harder for a child to disengage from screens if his or her parents are consistently looking down at their own phones or tablets. “Remember,” Martin says, “your children learn from your example. If they see you spending a lot of time with your face in front of a screen, they’ll also want to use technology at the same time. Try your best to save your time on social media for your lunch break, during nap time, or after your children have gone to bed.”

“Learning how to use screens, verbally communicate or socially interact will have a positive impact on language skills, relationships and overall health,” Martin says. “Spending time with their parents, learning through play is what young children need and want.”

About Christine Kyriakakos Martin

Christine Kyriakakos Martin (www.youvegotthisparenting.com) is the author of You’ve Got This! Keys To Effective Parenting For The Early Years.An early education expert and consultant, Martin is the founder and owner of Sunshine Preschool in Hopkinton, Mass. She has spoken on child-development topics at national education conventions and colleges.

11 Comments

  1. larescoe

    Very helpful post, thank you so much for sharing! It is definitely a social media world we live in now, filled with phones and tablets! I can see how it could be really hard to keep your kids screen time limited.

    Reply
    1. Silvie (Post author)

      Yes it is. With our schedule the boys know when they have to get off. It also helps that I can pause the home WiFi. 🙂

      Reply
  2. donna holder

    its important to make sure kids dont over do it being on the their ipads phones etc

    Reply
    1. Silvie (Post author)

      I agree. 🙂

      Reply
  3. Karen Jaras

    We set timers for all the grandchildren. They have limited computer as well as TV time. Get them outdoors when weather permits.

    Reply
    1. Silvie (Post author)

      Absolutely I love spending time outdoors with my kiddos. 🙂

      Reply
  4. Tamra Phelps

    I definitely agree that certain times, like dinner, etc., need to be phone and tablet-free. It’s not that I oppose kids using them– I think they have to master computers in this modern age. But, I think they need to learn how to regulate their time on them and lead full lives. I see too many teens and adults with the faces stuck in their phones at inappropriate times.

    Reply
    1. Silvie (Post author)

      I absolutely agree. We have a basket on a little side table in the dining room. Whenever we are about to eat everyone, including the grown ups have to put their phones etc. in it. 🙂

      Reply
  5. ouachitadawn

    I’m so glad these smart phones weren’t around when I was raising my daughter. I think I dodged a bullet.

    Reply
  6. Donna

    This is really good information. Tablets and computers are great in moderation, but it’s important to help children engage in the world around them.

    Reply
    1. Silvie (Post author)

      I absolutely agree Donna. 🙂

      Reply

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